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Using Laminate Flooring in the Basement

The
chameleon of floors, laminate flooring imitates other flooring options in
appearance. Made with a wood chip composite or fiberboard base, laminate floors
have a durable transparent top layer, which is essentially a photograph of
hardwood, tile, stone, or other flooring material. It is super durable and easy
to clean, but beware of water eating away at the soft center.

Pros:
Laminate flooring is fairly easy to install. Most laminate comes in a
“click-lock” design and is often combined with dry glue that’s already on the
product. Just a swipe of water from a sponge or cloth will activate the glue.
It’s durable; resists denting, fading, scratching, and it resists stains. You
can find wood grains, stone, and other natural materials. Unlike real hardwood,
which comes with many flaws that need to be thrown out or re-cut, there are no
defects in laminate flooring. This type of flooring is ideal for basements or anywhere
where “topical moisture” is encountered. Clean-up is very easy; just use a
vacuum or broom and slightly damp mop.

Cons:
Laminate flooring is hard under the foot; a foam under-padding helps. It’s slippery, though some manufacturers have
been developing slip resistant wear layers. The biggest disadvantage to
laminate flooring is you can’t sand or refinish it; if worn, scratched or
grooved it cannot be fixed – it must be replaced.

The chameleon of floors, laminate flooring imitates other flooring options in appearance—minus the hefty price tag. Homeowners love it for its durability, easy maintenance and damage-resistant exterior. Here is some more information.

Costs

Not nearly as expensive as regular hardwood, laminate flooring usually ranges in price from $1.50 to $3 per square foot, depending on the quality of the materials used. Get a price quote for your basement flooring installation to learn more.

Pros

Laminate flooring is fairly easy to install.

It’s very durable and will resist denting, fading, scratching and stains.

Laminate flooring can be purchased to imitate the look of other flooring types.

Cons

Laminate flooring can’t be sanded or refinished. If worn, scratched or grooved, it can’t be fixed.

Laminate flooring is hard under the foot, although a foam padding can help.

It can be slippery.

Durability

Since laminate is made with high-density fiber or wood particles, it’s considered a very durable flooring option. In addition, it won’t easily dent or scratch, so it will continue looking great (even in high-traffic areas) for years to come.

Maintenance

Laminate flooring will continue to look great after installation as long as it is regularly cleaned and maintained. Regularly sweep and vacuum to get rid of dirt and debris. Then, use a damp mop or sponge and cleaning solution of 2 parts vinegar and 3 parts water to get rid of stuck-on stains. Avoid abrasive cleaners and always dry the floor afterwards.

Common Questions and Answers

How is laminate flooring installed?

Most laminate flooring comes in a “click-lock” design and is combined with dry glue that’s already on the product. Just a swipe of water from a sponge or cloth will activate the glue. The installation process in general is easy enough to make it a DIY pro

What is laminate flooring made out of?

Laminate flooring is made from a wood chip composite or a fiberboard base with a transparent top layer. This layer is essentially a photograph of hardwood, tile, stone, or other flooring material, depending on the preference of the consumer.

History

First sold under the name Pergo, laminate flooring was invented in the late 1970s by the Swedish company Perstop. However, the product wasn’t marketed to the United States until 1994.

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